Paradox Of Identity In Frankenstein

Paradox Of Identity In Frankenstein

The paradox of identity spans history. A personal identity is a compilation of political beliefs, ethnic background, and religious morals; however, these are all a product of the time and society one comes from. Simply put, personal identity is culturally contrived. The challenge comes when distinguishing how much identity the individual deserves, and where society gets to limit it. This essay will examine the social construction of personal identity in 19th century liberalism, May Shelley?s Frankenstein, and finally Socialism.
Individuality is expressed through personal identity. What separates man from beast is free will. In the 19th century, liberalism became an identity in its own right based on freedom and controlled equality. A major tenet of liberal philosophy is the individual as an autonomous unit. The ability to act freely, with respect to society at large, is the goal of the individual. However, liberal philosophy proved to be a blatant contradiction to the actual practice. Only rich men were declared individuals, everyone else remained categorized in sub par units. Liberalism, on the heels of the Enlightenment, proved a break from tradition by embracing rationality and thought as important elements of man. ?Liberalized? men are taught what to think and how to

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