The Lottery

The Lottery

Shirley Jackson?s ?The Lottery? is a rebellious attempt to persuade America that our traditions are being carried on by thoughtless, ignorant men. Jackson tried to symbolize men as being the carriers of death and the women as the martyrs.
Jackson places the setting of the story in a very peaceful, small town. She described the day as, ?…clear and sunny, with the fresh warmth of a full summer day; the flowers were blossoming profusely and the grass was richly green (Pg. 83-84).? This gives the reader a sense that everything is perfect in the ?everybody knows everybody? type of town. It?s the typical American town. It?s essentially ideal.
The man that she tries to portray as the ignorant man the most is Old Man Warner. Warner has been around the small town for quite some time. He holds firm in his idea that tradition should be strictly followed and never forgotten. Jackson forces the reader to only look at the fact that Warner is just a stubborn, narrowminded man. He criticizes other towns for dropping the lottery, saying that the citizens are ?….a pack of crazy fools (Pg. 87).? Old Man Warner isn?t even happy with the way that the lottery is

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